What’s Your Why?

Our friend Rebecca Scritchfield has a new book out from Workman Publishing — Body Kindness: Transform Your Health from the Inside Out — and Never Say Diet Again — and it’s kind of everything. Because it’s all about changing your outside, by going inside. And not dieting. Which is...

162 0

Our friend Rebecca Scritchfield has a new book out from Workman Publishing — Body Kindness: Transform Your Health from the Inside Out — and Never Say Diet Again — and it’s kind of everything.

Body-Kindness-760

Because it’s all about changing your outside, by going inside. And not dieting. Which is obviously a message that we’re alll about. And today, for Love Yo’Self Week, we’re sharing an excerpt from Rebecca’s book on how and why you need to find your why to get healthy. It is so our jam.

rebecca

What’s Your Why?

When you embrace movement as a way of life, common barriers begin to melt away. Just like other areas of body kindness, the most important way to make a lifelong commitment to fitness is to focus on your Why. Once you’ve identified why exercise is important to you, then you can move on to the next two W’s: the What and the When. Imagine yourself 10 or 15 years from now.

What do you want to be able to enjoy in life, and what small changes can you make to see that through?

By integrating these future-oriented thoughts into your fitness plan, you are providing internal motivation to help you reach your goals.

I used to exercise to try to fit myself into some version of perfection that I hoped to see in the mirror — my idea of what a successful registered dietitian should look like in order to be worthy of a full roster of clients and a busy schedule. These days, the motivation behind my workouts is having the energy I need and honoring my commitment to sacred “me time” for movement.

Consider how you might translate a fitness to-do list into a fitness Why statement. Even if you proudly exercise regularly and wouldn’t dream of missing it, it’s worth asking “Why?” Your motivation should be positive, encouraging, and body loving (or at least body appreciating). The ultimate goal is to shift your inner dialogue away from exercising just to prevent fatness, to earn the right to eat dessert, or wear a crop top. You are more likely to form a solid connection with your body and develop a lifelong habit when you make movement meaningful and fun!

What’s your why, what and when? And be sure to head over to Fit Bottomed Zen to see another excerpt from this awesome book! —Rebecca Scritchfield

In this article

Join the Conversation